Working the land

During the first lockdown, in my own time last year, I began to design a number of Agricultural vehicles. I live In Shropshire, a large landlocked county that has lots of farm land. It made sense to me to have a go at thinking about some types of heavy machinery, or specifically perhaps look at making the machinery a little more compact. I also reviewed how things are made and why.

Combine and pickup
Tracked combine harvester
Spreading Tractor
Small spreader tractor with removable rear module.
Small spreader tractor with removable rear module.
Small spreader tractor with removable rear module.
Larger Spreader tractor with Composite arms.
Larger Spreader tractor with Composite arms.
Tractor spreader

Beachcombing

A couple of years ago I made a light re-design of the Mini Moke, as it is a car that I have strong emotional connections with. I grew up in Colombia and my parents owned one of the few Mini Mokes there. We had many adventures with that little car and it was the car I learnt to drive in, as well as pass my driving test in. It seemed an ideal candidate to re-make as a plywood and Balsa wood re-design. However, I was very faithful to the original design, and as a designer it felt as though I had not really attempted a new take on this little car. So, I gave myself the challenge to do my own design. I have provisionally called it the Remoke 2, but am thinking of better names for it. The idea for this version would be that it would be built out of Bio Epoxy and Flax/bamboo fibre composite. I am also looking at using a Small rotary engine which is hydrogen powered using Power paste. This is a new type of fuel that releases hydrogen. Hydrogen has the advantage that it does not produce CO2 emissions, so is a a good alternative to electric power. Although I would also consider using Electric power too. If hydrogen powered, it would be front wheel drive. If electric, it would be four wheel drive. If hydrogen powered, I have considered using a rotary (non Wankel) engine, which would be compact and light. A perfect little beach car, that also might be fun in town.

REMOKE
Remoke
Remoke
REMOKE
Remoke
Remoke
Remoke
Remoke
Remoke
Red Remoke
Movie

Interior compilation

In the late 1990’s I began to design yacht interiors. I have worked for numerous UK and Dutch studios over the years, as well as for myself. In most of the design studios I had a dual role, as an interior designer and/or as a yacht exterior designer. Below is a video that is a short compilation of work that I was involved in, although not comprehensive, it should give a view of the scope. In some cases i was responsible for all of the design, in some cases I was involved in the selection of fabrics, fixture and fittings or producing illustrations to present the designs. In some cases the yachts were built and sometimes they never got past the visual stage.

Yacht Interior Projects

30′ Sloep

This is my design for a 30 foot Semi-Displacement Sloep. Sloeps are basically Dutch day boats, often seen up and down Dutch canals, rivers and lakes. This design is for one that would essentially be used and sold in the UK, for many of the same kinds of inlands waterways, but potentially design for onshore use too. With a semi-displacement hull, probably, although I would be open to other options, so that the boat could cruise at 6 -26 knots, depending on engine type or mood.

It would be available in several possible versions, with two shown here; one with a closed transom and the other with a more contemporary semi-open transom.

30′ Sloep
Sloep 30′ Closed transom
Sloep 30′
Sloep 30′
Sloep 30′

Canal Cruising

After a Narrowboat holiday, I decided that it would be interesting to design a canal cruiser. Unlike a narrowboat, the aim of this design was to be as efficient in the water as possible. Narrowboats are actually great, well suited for their purpose in many ways. However, what they are not is hydrodynamic. They tend to plough through the water rather than glide through it. The upside is that they are very spacious. My design uses a more classic hull, which is less spacious, but far better suited to being electrically powered. With a bank of solar panels on top and a wind generator too, mounted on a folding mast, it would recharge a bank of batteries and be electrically powered. It could potentially also have a small generator if needed. The aim however of my design is to create a boat that offers some of the style of a yacht but provides access to the wonderful canal network that is available in the UK. The silent electric power would suit the type of cruising well, the hull would also create much less of a wake, therefore less wash and reduced erosion damage to the canal and river banks.

Canal Cruiser
Canal Cruiser
Canal Cruiser
Canal Cruiser
Canal Cruiser
Canal Cruiser
Canal Cruiser

Maserati Design Concept

I graduated from Coventry University 30 years ago this year. I have for the most part made my living as a Yacht Designer, although I have done a wide variety of projects ranging from product design, bikes and trikes, motorhomes etc. However, I have always been a bit of a car nut. However, I had not designed a proper sports/super car since I was at University. This last weekend I decided I should do something about that. So, as a celebration of 30 years and as a bit of a personal challenge, I designed this Maserati. I feel that Maserati has been somewhat in the shadow of Ferrari since both have been part of the FIAT group. Now Ferrari is going it’s own way, I think that it might be a chance to look at Maserati as a competitor not the brand that gets the hand-me-downs. I realise that this design does have elements of many supercars, including a number of Ferraris, I do not apologise about it, this is a design that I think is pretty. I hope some of you do too. It is inspired by Maseratis designed by Giorgetto Guigaro in the 1970’s, which frankly I think were some of the prettiest cars by the Marque. Would it be electric? No, though it could be, I guess. But I think this should have a mid mounted V8, perhaps a turbo/supercharged V6.

Does it have pop-up lights? Those are not legal any longer are they? Well, in this case it doesn’t, it has eyelids, they slide up. So, maintaining the look of pop-ups, but without the pedestrian collision issues.

Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal
Maserati Design Proposal

Fire & Rescue Truck

Whilst at University, 30 years ago now, I did a short project which was to design a Fire & Rescue Truck. It was an interesting project, albeit short. It never went past the sketching and rendering stage. Yet, there were some ideas that I found that could still be relevant now. It gave me the excuse of creating a truck, and it was a little bit of fun. 


The vehicle is a 4×4, with composite construction for the bodywork, and has a rear mounted arm that can be remotely operated in the rear upright cabin, the main vehicle cabin or remotely. The arm has interchangeable ends, which makes the vehicle multipurpose. The ends include an excavator, a monitor, large shears to cut car wreckage and grasping arms, but other ideas could be incorporated. The main principle is that the vehicle is versatile, rapid and capable on several terrains.

Fire & Rescue Truck

SIRIUSLY

Motor Yacht Sirius is the latest superyacht concept by Andrew Trujillo Design. It is a 90m motor yacht that in many ways is designed with interior space, and specifically floor to ceiling height in mind. The main deck has 3m floor to ceiling heights. The Owner’s deck has 2.8m floor to ceiling heights. This makes her unusual as yachts go. Often as a yacht designer when you are designing the interiors you have 2.1m, 2.2 or at a push 2.5m to play with. Having been involved on the design of motor yacht “Luminosity” which also has these very unusual deck heights, it felt worthwhile exploring this again in a fresh design. The added height adds an unmistakeable sense of airiness and is in itself a special feature, a definite luxury.

Sirius is one of the largest stars known, it is bright and seemed suitable as a choice for a yacht that like luminosity will feature large areas of glazing with panoramic views and plenty of light. Star light will also provide some of her power, with numerous solar panels being incorporated not only on her superstructure but also on the floor of the large swimming pool on her foredeck. Her design also features a large aft helideck.

Sirius 90M motor Yacht
Sirius Motor Yacht 90M
Sirius Motor Yacht 90M
Sirius Motor Yacht 90M
Sirius Motor Yacht 90M

Coriolis – 25 Metre Catamaran

The Coriolis Catamaran is a 25M concept design with twin masts, each mast mounted on a hull. The aim of Coriolis is to have a sail powered catamaran that is mainly intended for long distance cruising. With two hulls that are capacious rather than very slender, mean that she is not intended to win races (though probably quite swift), but rather use the twin mast configuration to enable each mast to be more compact and less loaded. It also provides and element of redundancy. It also means that power and loads are distributed more evenly and each mast is placed on structures that are well suited to the purpose; a mast on each pontoon makes more sense than a centrally placed mast, as the compressive loads do not tend to exert on one of the weakest parts of the vessel.

The yacht is intended to be as environmentally friendly as possible, so she is built using vegetable derived epoxy, with flax fibre for her hulls and superstructure. He decking would not be teak but cork; chosen for the renewability of the resource and great insulation plus impact resistance qualities.

She would be available with a choice of a conventional Bermuda rig or alternatively with a couple of wing sails. This design is one that I have been toying around with and is conceptual. It uses a NACA 2412 foil form but has a number of features that should mean that, in theory at least, the foil form could be varied by the use of cams inside the wing. The cams would act on the battens, which in turn would vary the profile depending on the direction of the wind, though this would be selected by the skipper. The sails are unstayed and can rotate fully 360 degrees, if required. This means that the wing sails could be used as wings even with a following wind.

The wings can be raised in a similar way to a junk rig, so the uppermost part of the sail is hoisted, and it raises each segment in turn. The cams that are attached to the battens have loose fitting bearings that not only allow the wing to rotate, but the bearing surface also slides up and down on the mast, though the tolerances would not be very tight, removing therefore chances for the cam “vertebrae” to seize up. The mast would probably be made of pultruded Carbon fibre, meaning tubes that are consistent and can be very stiff. The masts do not taper.

The cam system would probably be powered by electric winches or hydraulics. The sails would have a boom, inside which would be the hoisting mechanism, probably an electrically powered capstan winch.

Twin wing version

The boat would have feathering propellers, but the power to the propellers would be electric, with the propellers being used at times as generators to top up a bank of batteries. There would be a backup diesel generator for situations where it might be needed. The vessel also has numerous solar panels and a couple of wind powered generators at the top of the masts, which would ensure that enough power always exists for primary communications and navigation equipment. The aim of all being that she could sail under wind or electric power for the vast majority of the time, meaning a non-polluting and quiet vessel.

Bermuda Rig Version

On both versions the masts are attached at the top to one another, providing an element of rigidity and mutual support.

Bermuda rig Version
Coriolis has a garage up front to stow away Tenders and/or Jetskis.
Coriolis has a garage for the stowage of tenders or Jetskis.
Twin Wing Version of Coriolis